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The Making of a Tropical Disease A Short History of Malaria (Johns Hopkins Biographies of Disease) by Randall M. Packard

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Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Diseases & disorders,
  • Tropical medicine,
  • Medical,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Infectious Diseases,
  • Public Health,
  • Medical / History,
  • History,
  • Malaria

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages320
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9452839M
ISBN 100801887127
ISBN 109780801887123

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The Making of a Tropical Disease Once upon a time there was a mosquito. And this mosquito carried something with her and gave it to everyone she met. Men in peculiar outfits sprayed all over the land, and the mosquito was banished, in that land at least. This is the story of malaria/5. The Making of a Tropical Disease. Malaria sickens hundreds of millions of people—and kills one to three million—each year. Despite massive efforts to eradicate the disease, it remains a major public health problem in poorer tropical regions. But malaria has not always been concentrated in tropical areas. About this book. Malaria sickens hundreds of millions of people--and kills one to three million--each year. Despite massive efforts to eradicate the disease, it remains a major public health problem in poorer tropical regions. But malaria has not always been concentrated in tropical .   The Making of a Tropical Disease: A Short History of Malaria. Malaria sickens hundreds of millions of people—and kills one to three million—each year. Despite massive efforts to eradicate the disease, it remains a major public health problem in poorer tropical regions. But malaria has not always been concentrated in tropical areas.5/5(1).

  The Making of a Tropical Disease by Randall M. Packard, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(95). Johnson, R. () Book Review: The Making of a Tropical Disease: A Short History of Malaria by Randall M. Packard (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press). [Review] Full text not available in this t a copy from the Strathclyde authorAuthor: R. Johnson. The Making of a Tropical Disease: A Short History of Malaria PDF. Once upon a time there was a mosquito. And this mosquito carried something with her and gave it to everyone she met. Men in peculiar outfits sprayed all over the land, and the mosquito was banished, in that land at least. Tropical diseases encompass all diseases that occur solely, or principally, in the tropics. In practice, the term is often taken to refer to infectious diseases that thrive in hot, humid conditions, such as malaria, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, Chagas disease, African trypanosomiasis, and dengue.

As of , the World Health Organization categorizes the following communicable diseases as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs): Leprosy (Hansen’s Disease) Lymphatic Filariasis. Schistosomiasis. Soil-transmitted Helminths (STH) (Ascaris, Hookworm, and Whipworm) The following six NTDs can be controlled or even eliminated through mass.   This short book carries through its thoughtful approach with admirable power and consistency." Lancet - Bill Bynum "The Making of a Tropical Disease is a vigorously argued and accessibly narrated ecological history of malaria, a contribution as much to social medicine and studies in the political economy of disease as to medical history."Price: $   This book is the first in a new series on the Biographies of Disease by The Johns Hopkins University Press, The Making of a Tropical Disease: A Short History of Malaria. Malaria has killed billions of humans throughout recorded and unrecorded history, and it continues to kill millions every year/5(39).   The Making of a Tropical Disease was published some ten years after the malaria community, driven by concerns of scientists in sub-Saharan Africa, galvanised the World Health Organization (WHO) to make the eradication or elimination of malaria a priority. With the announcement of ‘Roll Back Malaria’ (RBM) in , scientists were excited and wary of a Written: